For Love of Coron

There's no other way but to be in the dark depths...
There’s no other way but to be in the dark depths…

“Sorry, our flight to Busuanga is cancelled due to sunset limitation!”

That was during our last trip to Coron  17 months ago but we were unfazed, we still went for the trip few hours later aboard the Super Ferry boat.  Undoubtedly, it was a memorable trip and it is always a joy to be back in one of my favorite places up north.  Obviously I love Coron, it is an enchanting town I keep coming back again and again.  I was simply thrilled we were back shortly than original plans.

Taking the last evening flight from CdeO, I waited seven hours for our early morning flight, to be sure from the sunset limitation.  My lack of sleep had taken its toll, I doze off as we got airborne.  The summer heat greeted us as we taxied the air strip to the terminal, we were favored again with the good weather!  With the roads completely paved to the town, the trip was shortened to 45 minutes – the road network is almost completed, definitely a good improvement for the local economy.

Island Pleasures

Seadive Resort has been my favorite refuge but Angel had it arranged at Corn Ecolodge, a new boutique hotel right down town, accessible to any point of interest in the town.  Wanting to make most of our time, we headed to Seadive to arrange for morrow’s dive trip and to get a boat for an afternoon spot hopping.  Kogyu Maru is the last shipwreck in Bacuit Bay we haven’t explored, so we were thrilled it was scheduled for the morrow, with Irako Maru and East Tangat Wreck it was a perfect combination for the next day’s descent unto the depths.  And we are more fortunate we had a cheaper boat fee as three foreigners (based in Kenya) joined us the afternoon hopping, letting us decide the best proverbial sites to visit.

Active marine life in Siete Pecados marine Sanctuary
Active marine life in Siete Pecados Marine Sanctuary

We choose Kayangan Lake/Cove, Atuwayan Beach, Skeleton Wreck and Siete Pecados – in that order.  I knew visiting these spots brings heartwarming memories when I first set foot in Busuanga five years ago with DIY friends.  This homecoming is my 5th year anniversary in Calamianes group, also my 5th visit to the town.  I guess I never go tired of savoring its nature wonders and pleasures.  I think the same sentiment is true for the three Kenyan tourists with us.

The trek and the overwhelming view in Kayangan Lake and Cove, the quiet white beach and pristine waters  in Atuwayan which was all to ourselves, the rich marine life in Skeleton Wreck as well in Siete Pecados Marine Sanctuary have filled up our afternoon we barely made it to Mt. Tapyas.  Angel and I agreed earlier for the climb to get a glimpse once again of our favorite hill sunset.  We rushed up, the urgings of the golden panorama stirred our desire to reach the summit before the sun hid from our sight – chasing our sunset!  We stood there with our big smiles watching the horizon in its golden splendor until it ebbed down in the vast ocean yonder.  We lingered a little longer until it gets dark waiting for the big white cross to light up, creating a warm glow in the mountain top.  We descend slowly, the moon perfectly lighting up our way down the steps.

Exploring the Dark

The dive shop was already filled with people when we got there the next morning, as usual we were joined with foreigners – a Dutch and American.  Boris (the Dutch) went with us with DM Rene, just perfect as we’re not crowded.  We cruised for an hour for Irako Maru, the cheery sunny weather was just perfect for good visibility.  We did the giant step but the water in the area was choppy, I requested for a brief rest as I got hold of the bouy line. We slowly descend, it was all hazy and there was nothing in between until we caught sight of some solid form.

Descending through the bouy line
Descending through the bouy line

As a kid, one of my great fear is the dark but now have dramatically outgrown it,  mystery of the darkness consumes my sub-conscious.  Somehow, wrecks always captivate my senses – there is that urge to rush what’s inside.  We went inside penetrating the darks searching every corner with my torch, for what?  Again, I got distracted I barely noticed the marine life and failed to take any photos.  I was too engrossed handling my torch as we go through compartments, rooms and corners. Practically we have explored more of the vast Irako compared last time, at 37.7m we went deeper inside the wreck.  Our DM signaled for the bouyline just in time that my NDL went 2 minutes.

The light at the end of the tunnel
The light at the end of the tunnel

We cruise leisurely for our next site still within southeast side of Lusong Island  while having our early lunch, as our surface interval. Kogyo Maru is a new site for us , at 158m long it’s another big ship slightly larger than Irako although slightly shallower.  The water was still choppy and I need to steady myself again with the bouy line until we descend slowly.  Just like the others, its body is encrusted with corals with tropical fishes hovering, many specie of soft corals hanging and tangling the steel bars.  Following DM Rene, we penetrated the narrow passage one after the other, Angel behind me as last in the row.   We did find thousand of bags of cement turned rock hard pillows, further we found too thousand rolls of interlink wires now fossilized.  We continued to explore all possible passage until we come out of a hole and swam a bit over the wreck.  We ascend back at the bouy line after 40 minutes with my air still at 110 bars.

Over the shipwreck
Over the shipwreck

We cruise to Tangat Island for our last site of the day, East Tangat Wreck is believed to be either a tugboat or an anti-submarine craft listing to starboard down a sandy slope.  I was grateful that the water was calm already when we got there, a respite from two previous sites being rough on surface.  This small wreck still has narrow passages worthy to be penetrated as conclusion for the day’s descents. Once we lost our DM and as we waited, emerged shortly from a small hole beside the wreck, Angel and I averted our attention to the opposite side and they quickly vanished in the dark.  We found soft colorful corals on its sides, spotted too nudis, sea squirts and huge flatworm. The mast was also encrusted with soft and hard corals. At 40m length, it wasn’t difficult to cover the whole stretch surveying the sides, actually we circled it three times just enjoying the marine life with calm and shallow waters.  We surfaced after 48 minutes with my air still at 140 bars.

Exploring a wreck is always a joy!
Exploring a wreck is always a joy!

It was amusing as I swam back to our boat, when the crew from other boat we passed asked (in Visayan) our DM if I am Korean, laughingly I answered back I am Filipino and speak Visayan.  I can’t blame him, since most if not all clients of dive shops are foreigners.  We cruised back to town with happy faces!  Later we treated ourselves with a sumptuous dinner at our favorite Coron Bistro.

Incessant Passion

Sometimes there is that force inside us that drives one to go frontward , we promised ourselves in October 2011 to visit the islands after five years but we made it after seventeen months, apparently our love for Coron led us for an earlier schedule. Coming to Coron is not cheap, I spent the night at the terminal lacking sleep but it wasn’t a hindrance.  I got blues both in my arms due to the choppy waters but don’t mind it at all.  All for the love of the depths.

Then again, I still have reasons for another visit to Coron – many reasons to explore the eastern side of the islands.  May be after five years we will. May be, who knows…

NB.  Underwater photos courtesy of Angel

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